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A Writer’s Imagination

When creating fictional characters, what direction do you reach in your imagination? Is the fiction writer looking for a hero or a villain, a savior or a devil, a winner or a loser?
As a meliorist, for me, it was easy.  A meliorist is a person who believes that the human condition can be improved a little bit every day through concerted effort. Kind of like an optimistic humanist. When creating fictional characters, what direction do you reach in your imagination?  Is the fiction writer looking for a hero or a villain, a savior or a devil, a winner or a loser?FIRST PUPPY PHOTOS 5-15 012
This fiction writer’s imagination naturally favors people whose satisfaction depends on taking action to make the world a better place. This may seem like a wise approach, but take a look at modern print and video.  Apparently, vampires, serial killers, molesters, terrorists, monsters, extra terrestrials, transformers, and zombies are what crawl out of many writers’ imaginations these days.
Who would want to read a positive story about a boy who loves his uncle enough to take a risk to help him pursue his dream?  Who would want to read a story about a boy who is loyal and supportive and kind, who yearns for a life of service to others?  Oh, those readers are out there.  At least I think they are.
Uncle Rufus is motivated by a desire to help others discover their true nature through Astrology, with the extra added outrageously audacious benefit of putting an end to religious differences and working toward the peaceful unification of the human race.  Is there anyone out there who could identify with this character, or is it just too much?  It may very well be easier for the reader to wrap his or her mind around the search for a bad guy.  When the evil doer is finally caught or killed, the reader can breathe a sigh of relief and feel safe.  A neat little package of crisis and resolution carefully constructed to make the reader feel better about. . . . . . , what exactly?
Back to Astrologer’s Apprentice.  Yawn.  No one dies.  No one even gets sick. No one gets hurt, or threatened, or violated, or chased through the woods, or even down the street.  Everything in the story is not only plausible, but it has the potential to enrich the reader’s thinking. Does the typical reader really want some form of enlightenment, or just entertainment?  Oh wait a minute, there is no typical reader.

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